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Physiotherapy and Winter Running

Although the winter cold weather is upon us, it does not mean that avid runners have to give up this passion to stay fit and healthy. Yonge and Bloor physio encourage runners to prepare for the colder temperatures and potentially hazardous road conditions.Being warm when you run is all about managing moisture, ie. sweat. A proper base layer that wicks moisture away from your skin is essential. It should be followed by a mid-layer that has some insulating qualities and is not made of cotton. And lastly an outer-layer that is resistant to wind and moisture. Don’t forget some thin moisture wicking gloves and hat as well as quality running socks to keep your toes from freezing. Rosedale physio endorses a smart approach to this winter activity. In addition to your clothing choices, make sure drivers can see you with reflective outerwear and/or LED lights.

Runners cannot count on sidewalks or even roads to be cleared in areas around Yonge and Bloor in Rosedale. At times, you will be running on uneven and slippery ground. To avoid falls that can result in significant injuries, Rosedale physio suggests to shorten your stride from your normal running stride. This allows you to keep your centre of gravity well within your base of support at all times and greatly reduces the likelihood of a fall. You may feel awkward at first taking such short steps, but in time you and your body will become comfortable with the new stride. Visiting your physiotherapist in Rosedale can help to avoid injury while running, as they can give you the necessary tools for an injury-free season.

Running in the winter with a friend is highly recommended, as you will have someone with you in the event of an injury, especially in more remote areas. Running with a friend also helps to motivate you to get out on those colder days when you are reluctant to leave your warm house.

It is important to remember to take it easy when running in the winter. The goal is not to set any records in these colder months, but rather see it as an opportunity to get a good volume of kilometres in so that when the spring arrives you are ready to push yourself harder because you have experienced an injury-free winter running season.